SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER THERAPY ONLINE

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 ONLINE THERAPY for SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

Social Anxiety Disorder Therapy Online

 

Struggling with Social Anxiety, Panic Attacks and Low Self-Esteem?

Would You like Help to Learn How to Overcome Your Anxiety?

I CAN HELP YOU THROUGH ONLINE THERAPY SESSIONS VIA SKYPE

Social Anxiety Disorder Therapy, Social Anxiety Treatment Online

Get Help from an Online Therapist for Social Anxiety Disorder

EMAIL ME TO SCHEDULE A SESSION

PDMSTRONG@MAC.COM

SOCIAL ANXIETY THERAPY ONLINE

Online Mindfulness Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLk59MYa5iRTmaTtgpe-rAFdrZbZ9ZT_TI

Visit my Youtube channel to learn more about how online therapy can help you

Welcome! My name is Peter Strong, and I am a professional psychotherapist living in Boulder, Colorado, and I offer Online Therapy as one of my choices to clients who are seeking help in managing Social Anxiety or Agoraphobia.

Now, as you know, it can be very challenging indeed to get the kind of help that you need for your anxiety if you find it very difficult to leave home, or if you are struggling with a Driving Anxiety, which is very common for people with Social Anxiety Disorders. So, this Online Therapy becomes a very good choice to consider. If you are interested in Online Therapy for your Social Anxiety or Agoraphobia, please head on over to my website, CounselingTherapyOnline.com, and read the relevant pages about Online Therapy for Social Anxiety and Agoraphobia. Then, if you are considering trying this approach, please contact me and we will discuss if this is the right approach for you. It's very important that you find an approach that you feel comfortable with, so we will discuss that before you schedule a session. All you need, of course, is Skype and PayPal accounts and then you are ready to go. Very easy to get started and I can help you with that.

So, what is Mindfulness Therapy, and how can this help with Social Anxiety and Agoraphobia? Well, primarily, Mindfulness Therapy teaches you how to work with those emotions, those very strong emotional reactions that get triggered by thoughts about leaving the security of your home or other secure area. Agoraphobia is often translated as a fear of open spaces, but that is not quite true. What it is really pointing to is this extreme fear of leaving a controlled environment, a secure area where you feel in control, and it is often associated with panic attacks and the fear of having a panic attack in a public area, where it is out of your control.

So, these kind of reactions can be very intense indeed and it takes some work to work with them, but it is entirely possible, and Mindfulness Therapy is one of the best methods that I know, because it changes your relationship to these underlying emotional reactions, these habitual emotional reactions. It changes your relationship to them from becoming identified with them and reacting to them with further reactivity to a relationship based on friendship, awareness and compassion; the primary hallmarks of Mindfulness Therapy. It's about learning how to make friends with those emotions. If you try to fight them or resist them, they don't change; you've probably tried that already. If you try to argue with them, or tell yourself I shouldn't be feeling this way, that seldom works very well either. What is truly needed is to establish a true level of presence, mindfulness, with those underlying emotions. This is the heart of friendship; friendship is what heals; love is what heals. This is what we cultivate in a very detailed way. You learn how to transform your emotions, or more specifically, how to allow your emotions to transform themselves.

So, if you would like to learn more about Mindfulness Therapy for your Social Anxiety or Agoraphobia, please visit my website and contact me, and I look forward to helping you through Mindfulness Therapy. Thank you.

CONTACT ME

PDMSTRONG@MAC.COM

Mindfulness Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

"I was so afraid of what people were thinking about me. I was terrified of having a panic attack. It really paralyzed me and prevented me going out with my friends. Mindfulness Therapy has really helped, better than I would have expected." - Alex, New York

EMAIL ME TO ASK YOUR QUESTIONS AND SCHEDULE AN ONLINE THERAPY SESSION TODAY

PDMSTRONG@MAC.COM

 

"Mindfulness Therapy is one of the most effective approaches currently available for successfully managing anxiety. Now Mindfulness Therapy is available online via individual Skype sessions."

Overcoming Social Anxiety through Mindfulness Therapy Online

"Make friends with the anxiety and fear that lies at the core of your anxieties and learn how to care for that fear as you would care for a frightened child. This is mindfulness in action and is the root of all true healing."

- The Path of Mindfulness Meditation, by Dr Peter Strong.

 

Social anxiety and agoraphobia describe conditions of intense anxiety often accompanied by frequent panic attacks that are triggered by the anticipation of having to leave a secure space and venture into an unknown environment. Often, it is the very fear of having a panic attack in public that is most debilitating. You can learn more about social anxiety or social phobia and general treatment options on the PsychCentral website page Social Anxiety Disorder Treatment.

Mindfulness Therapy for Social Anxiety and Agoraphobia, now available online provides an important resource for individuals who wish to overcome their social anxiety or shyness and the debilitating panic attacks that accompany social anxiety disorders.

These intense anxiety reactions are based on negative core beliefs and habitual reactive thinking that operate outside of our control. Mindfulness Therapy teaches individuals how to work with these beliefs and, most importantly, the core emotions that empower the beliefs. This kind of therapy can be provided very effectively online through Skype. All you need is a laptop and you are ready to go. Many people with social anxiety find this approach much easier and less intimidating than going to the therapist’s office and this is why Online Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety is becoming so popular. Dr Peter Strong is an expert in mindfulness-based therapy and teaches mindfulness therapy techniques to people all over the world through Skype sessions.

 

Social Anxiety Disorder is a type of phobia, a reactive emotional disorder to a range of social settings that are perceived as threatening, mainly due to the unfamiliarity of the situation. Most of us feel a degree of nervousness in new situations or when asked to speak in public, but those with SAD develop anxiety and panic attacks that can be completely overwhelming, and may result in a person going to extreme lengths to avoid public places or situations that generate the fear reactions. The fear of being scrutinized by others, of making a fool of yourself and extreme self-consciousness can be a major impediment to ones career and social life and may result in feelings of extreme loneliness and shattered self-confidence and self-esteem.

The other distressing effect of social anxiety is that it leads to the proliferation of worrying about upcoming events, imagining all kinds of scenarios with negative outcomes. Even the most basic tasks such as shopping at the supermarket can consume so much emotional energy that it simply becomes easier to give up. So much emotional energy is expended in this endless worrying that we are left feeling completely drained and fatigued, which makes us even less able to cope. In its most extreme form, social phobia can lead to agoraphobia, where it becomes impossible to venture outside the confines of ones home, or very well-defined “safe zone.”

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

Seeking some form of psychotherapy for anxiety disorders is a very sensible approach, and can make a huge difference. Generally, the process-oriented therapies, like cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are particularly effective, because they aim at changing the underlying beliefs and patterns of negative reactive thinking that create the anxiety. However, what is even more important than the thoughts or beliefs at the core of anxiety conditions are the emotions, the feeling energy that empowers those thoughts and beliefs. This is what we address in Mindfulness Therapy for Social Anxiety, which is a form of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Essentially, you learn how to focus mindfulness on the underlying core emotions so that you begin to build a conscious relationship with the emotion. You naturally begin to see more of the detailed structure of the emotion. As always, it is what is not seen that has most power over you, and mindfulness therapy is directed at exploring the structure of our inner feelings in great detail.

When you develop a mindfulness-based relationship with your inner emotions you set up a completely different inner environment that greatly facilitates transformation, resolution and healing of anxiety and fear. The simple fact is that reactivity inhibits change, while mindfulness promotes change and healing. You first learn to recognize the impulse to react with fear or panic as it arises, and to respond at a very early stage to the impulse with mindful-attention. This simple action stops the reactivity proliferating into worry and negative thinking, and opens up a brief moment of choice, a space before the reaction takes off. This is the beginning of the deconditioning process. With practice you can develop and lengthen this space, especially in mindfulness meditation sessions, which become practice grounds for developing new ways of responding to your emotions and the associated external situations.

As you develop this space, what is called the “therapeutic space of mindfulness,” you create an opportunity in which the trapped emotional energy that powers the reactions can unfold, unwind and become much more malleable. This inner freedom allows emotions to change and transform, which eventually leads to their resolution. We all know the importance of “facing our feelings.” Well Mindfulness Meditation Therapy provides the method and details of how to do that, and in a way that leads to beneficial change, rather than simply re-experiencing the emotional reactivity. It is a well-established fact that Exposure Therapy, in which you deliberately make controlled contact with your fear or phobia, is an essential part of healing, but the whole point of such therapy is not to simply re-experience the trauma, but to experience it differently. Mindfulness therapy allows you to do this very effectively, and with mindfulness-based exposure therapy your mind will rapidly learn new perceptions and new pathways of experiencing that are not based on emotional reactivity but on balanced responsiveness. This in turn naturally leads to more functional and more positive thinking and more useful core beliefs that are empowered by positive emotional energy, rather than the previous negative energy.

 

Mindfulness-based therapy - How to Overcome Social Anxiety Disorder

Learn how to overcome Social Anxiety Disorder - The key is to develop a friendly relationship towards the anxiety itself. If you stop fighting it but rather care for it, like you would care for a child that is in pain, then you will create the right conditions that will allow the anxiety to heal and resolve. I cannot emphasize just how important this is.

How to overcome Social Anxiety Disorder

Welcome! My name is Peter Strong and I provide online therapy over Skype. If you would like to learn how to overcome social anxiety disorder, then please go to my website, learn more about the Mindfulness Therapy techniques that I teach for overcoming social anxiety disorder, and then contact me. That is the most important thing - simply email me and talk about the issues that are affecting you and ask any questions you have about the online therapy process and I will be happy to answer them.

Overcoming social anxiety disorder is a very structured process that we explore during the online therapy sessions. I will teach you very practical methods, based on mindfulness, for actually changing the underlying habitual reactive process that generates social anxiety.

The most important thing for most people is to actually begin to develop a relationship with your anxiety that is not reactive and that is not struggling with the anxiety, pushing it away or trying to get rid of it or fighting it in some way.

In almost all cases, if there is any form of resistance to anxiety the effect is going to be counter-productive. It will simply strengthen the anxiety. The same goes for avoidance, too, which is another form of resistance. Many people try to avoid their anxiety and that makes it worse also.

The key to changing any form of anxiety, including social anxiety disorder is to actually focus your conscious awareness on the anxiety itself, and generate a friendly relationship with the underlying emotions. This is what creates the conditions that allow the anxiety to heal and change and finally resolve itself entirely. This is what we explore in great detail during Mindfulness Therapy.

If you would like to learn more about how to overcome social anxiety disorder, please go to my website, learn more about the process of Mindfulness Therapy and then email me. Thank you!

Online Counseling for Social Anxiety Disorder

Online Counseling offers many advantages to the client, and convenience has to be one of the greatest reasons why Online Counseling is becoming more and more popular. For people suffering from Social Anxiety, Agoraphobia and other forms of anxiety disorders, it is often very difficult to leave home and go into the unfamiliar and often clinical settings of the therapist's office. The Online Counseling format is much more relaxed and less intimidating because you don't have to leave home.

The online counseling route can be very effective and well worth trying. During each Skype session I will teach you very effective mindfulness-based methods for working with anxiety. After a few weeks practicing what I teach, you will notice a dramatic reduction in both the frequency and the intensity of your anxiety attacks. Eventually you will be able to say that you are essentially free from anxiety, and even if an anxiety attack does happen you will be well prepared and know exactly how to manage it so that you do not become overwhelmed by it and it will resolve much faster than previously.

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

Effective, Convenient and Affordable

Please feel free to email me and ask any questions you may have about the mindfulness therapy approach for overcoming social anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and other forms pf anxiety. We can schedule a Skype session to see if this approach is right for you - There is no charge if you decide otherwise. Most of my clients see quite remarkable improvements after as few as 3-4 sessions. Please contact me and let's discuss how this approach can help you overcome you social anxiety or agoraphobia. Unlike traditional counseling, my approach is very focused and very practical. I will teach you the tools for managing and resolving your anxiety, and these mindfulness-based methods are exceptionally effective.

 

How to Overcome Social Anxiety and Social Phobia through Mindfulness Therapy

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety and Agoraphobia

Mindfulness Therapy is an advanced form of CBT that teaches you how to control your emotions as well as your thoughts, breaking the vicious cycle that creates Anxiety

Mindfulness Therapy teaches you how to not become overwhelmed by habitual thoughts and beliefs; it teaches you how to stop feeding the process of 'what if?' thinking that feeds over self-consciousness and fear about what others may be thinking about you. The good news is that you can change the habit of anxiety thinking and negative thinking by learning how to change your relationship to your thoughts. The key is to recognize them as soon as they arise, cultivate conscious awareness of the thoughts (which is NOT the same as thinking about the thoughts) and breaking the habit of becoming identified with the thoughts that arise in public situations. Learning to manage thoughts more effectively is a central focus in CBT as described in the article below and in Mindfulness Therapy, which is a more advanced form of cognitive therapy.

During Mindfulness Therapy we also focus on changing the inner structure of the anxiety emotion itself so that it resolves and becomes neutralized. When you resolve the emotion then there is nothing to feed the reactive thoughts and the result is that they change will quite quickly.

You can learn more about Mindfulness Therapy, which I offer online by reading the pages on my website and watching the videos on my YouTube Channel.

There is now lots of evidence showing that both CBT and Mindfulness-based therapy works well online. CONTACT ME if you would like to schedule a session of online therapy.

 

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may treat social anxiety disorder more effectively than medication...

The reason why CBT and cognitive therapy are effective for treating anxiety, including social anxiety disorder is that they work directly on transforming the underlying process of reactive thinking that feeds the anxiety.

Social Anxiety responds well to mindfulness therapy, which I provide online via Skype. Please contact me if you would like to lean more about how online mindfulness therapy can help you.

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

Try Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

Welcome! My name is Peter Strong, and I am a professional online psychotherapist. I provide online therapy via Skype. I provide online therapy for anxiety, including social anxiety disorder, and the style of online therapy that I provide is called Mindfulness Therapy, which is extremely effective for Social Anxiety Disorder. So, if you are interested in online therapy for social anxiety disorder, please visit my website, CounselingTherapyOnline.com, and email me, and then we can discuss whether online therapy is a good choice for your social anxiety, or social phobia, and then we can schedule a Skype therapy session.

The Mindfulness Therapy approach works by teaching you how to be present for your anxiety without becoming overwhelmed by it and without becoming lost in reactive thinking, which effectively feeds the underlying anxiety. So, through very practical and direct methods using mindfulness, you can learn a totally different way of processing this emotional reactivity and the cognitive reactivity that underlies social anxiety.

This is quite a different approach to the usual style of talk therapy or counseling. We are not talking about our emotions, so much, as we are investigating the process that creates that anxiety in your mind - the actual patterns of reactive thinking, and also the nature of your relationship to the anxiety itself. Most people have a very poor relationship with their emotions, especially, of course, if they are unpleasant emotions. We tend to avoid them or we resist them with some form of aversion or hatred.

However, avoidance and aversion simply make the problem worse and prevents that anxiety from resolving. It keeps the anxiety in a state of agitation and feeds the fire essentially. So, in Mindfulness Therapy, we learn to be with that anxiety or other emotions without feeding the fire, and we allow the anxiety to heal.

So, this is a very effective approach indeed, especially for anxiety, but it's also effective for depression, and also for working with addictions, too.

If you would like to learn more about online therapy for social anxiety disorder or social phobia or if you would like to learn about online therapy for working with other forms of anxiety or depression, or addictions, do please visit my website, CounselingTherapyOnline.com and contact me. Email me with your questions and I will be happy to discuss and I will be happy to discuss whether online therapy is a good option for you, and when you are ready, we can schedule a Skype therapy session. So, please visit my website and contact me and we can go from there. Thank you!

 

Here is an article in dailyRx for you to read...

(dailyRx News) Antidepressants may be the go-to treatment for social anxiety disorder, but one type of talk therapy may be more effective and have longer-lasting effects.

A new study assessed treatments for social anxiety. These treatments included several types of medications and talk therapy.

The study authors found that individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was the most effective and longest-lasting treatment for social anxiety disorder.

"Social anxiety is more than just shyness," said lead study author Evan Mayo-Wilson, DPhil, of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in a press release. "People with this disorder can experience severe impairment, from shunning friendships to turning down promotions at work that would require increased social interaction. The good news from our study is that social anxiety is treatable. Now that we know what works best, we need to improve access to psychotherapy for those who are suffering."

CBT is a one-on-one therapy that asks the patient to assess the relationships between his or her thoughts, feelings and behaviors. Dr. Mayo-Wilson noted that it can help patients overcome irrational fears.

"CBT and especially mindfulness-based CBT prove to be very effective for treating social anxiety disorder and other anxiety disorders because this approach treats the underlying cause of the anxiety disorder, whereas antidepressants and other medications can only provide temporary relief from symptoms, but do nothing to change the underlying cognitive and psychological causes," said Peter Strong, PhD, Professional Psychotherapist at the Boulder Center for Mindfulness Therapy in Colorado.

"In my opinion, anxiety medications are over over-prescribed, and should not be the first choice for treating anxiety," Dr. Strong told dailyRx News.

Social anxiety disorder is marked by an irrational fear of social situations. It often begins in the early teen years and can color formative periods in which the patient is expected to be social but can't or refuses to.

Many patients with social anxiety disorder may never get treatment — either because they do not seek it or they do not have access to it. For those who do, medication is by far the most common approach, the study authors noted.

However, according to the study, which comprised 101 past studies for a total of 13,164 patients with social anxiety disorder, medication may not be the best approach.

However, according to the study, which comprised 101 past studies for a total of 13,164 patients with social anxiety disorder, medication may not be the best approach.

About 9,000 patients had taken medication or a placebo pill. Roughly 4,000 underwent some form of therapy.

The authors found that CBT was the most effective form of treatment among these patients. It produced results that lasted beyond treatment.

But that doesn't mean pills won't work — the most common antidepressants to treat social anxiety, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, were also effective. The authors noted, however, that these and similar treatments often have severe side effects, don't work at all or don't have lasting effects when treatment stops.

The study authors said more patients with social anxiety disorder should have access to treatment.

"Greater investment in psychological therapies would improve quality of life, increase workplace productivity, and reduce health care costs," Dr. Mayo-Wilson said. "The health care system does not treat mental health equitably, but meeting demand isn't simply a matter of getting insurers to pay for psychological services. We need to improve infrastructure to treat mental health problems as the evidence shows they should be treated. We need more programs to train clinicians, more experienced supervisors who can work with new practitioners, more offices, and more support staff."

The authors noted that the research did not look at the effect of CBT and medications combined.

The study was published online Sept. 25 in The Lancet Psychiatry.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence funded the research. Study author David M. Clark developed one type of CBT used in the study.

Click here to view original web page at www.dailyrx.com

Talk to a therapist through Skype for Help with Social Anxiety

ONLINE THERAPIST FOR SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

 

Social Phobia Therapy Online

Online Therapy for Overcoming Social Phobia

Online therapy for Social Anxiety and Social Phobia - Online Therapist for social anxiety

Online Therapist for Social Phobia

Welcome! My name is Peter Strong, and I am a professional online therapist. I provide online therapy via Skype for the treatment of anxiety, depression and addictions. I also provide online therapy for social phobia. Social phobia occurs when we have an extreme fear of what people might think about us, and it's characterized by rapid reactive thinking, and this is something we can control very effectively through a system of therapy that I teach, which is called Mindfulness Therapy.

This is a way of working with habitual reactive thinking. It allows us to see these thoughts and stop them from proliferating, because it's the proliferation of thinking about the fear of what people might think, or fear of being judged, that creates social anxiety and social phobia. So, this is a very important part of changing our social phobia - learning to deal with these thoughts. Also. during these mindfulness therapy sessions for social phobia, we focus on the underlying emotion itself, the emotional reaction that precedes the reactive thinking. And, in this case we use mindfulness to form a very effective healing relationship with that underlying anxiety. Of course, reactive thinking and reactive behaviors simply reinforce that underlying anxiety. So, when we can stop the reactive thinking, we are already well on the way to healing that underlying anxiety. But, there are other processes involved in healing anxiety besides managing thinking, and that is something we explore in great detail during these online therapy sessions.

So, if you would like to learn more about online therapy for social phobia, please email me and then we can discuss in more detail if online therapy is a good choice for you to manage your social phobia. Thank you!

 

Online Therapy for Social Phobia

Social Phobia or Social Anxiety Disorder responds very well to Mindfulness Therapy, which I provide online - Mindfulness Therapy helps you control the habitual reactive thinking and catastrophizing that feeds the underlying anxiety.

Online Therapy for Social Phobia

Watch this video and CONTACT ME to schedule a therapy session via Skype for your social phobia.

PDMSTRONG@MAC.COM

Online Therapy for Social Phobia via Skype

Online Therapy for Social Phobia Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOsYK2F9ntk

Welcome! My name is Peter Strong, and I am a professional online therapist. I provide online therapy via Skype for the treatment of anxiety, depression and addictions. I also provide online therapy for social phobia. Social phobia occurs when we have an extreme fear of what people might think about us, and it's characterized by rapid reactive thinking, and this is something we can control very effectively through a system of therapy that I teach, which is called Mindfulness Therapy.

This is a way of working with habitual reactive thinking. It allows us to see these thoughts and stop them from proliferating, because it's the proliferation of thinking about the fear of what people might think, or fear of being judged, that creates social anxiety and social phobia. So, this is a very important part of changing our social phobia - learning to deal with these thoughts. Also. during these mindfulness therapy sessions for social phobia, we focus on the underlying emotion itself, the emotional reaction that precedes the reactive thinking. And, in this case we use mindfulness to form a very effective healing relationship with that underlying anxiety. Of course, reactive thinking and reactive behaviors simply reinforce that underlying anxiety. So, when we can stop the reactive thinking, we are already well on the way to healing that underlying anxiety. But, there are other processes involved in healing anxiety besides managing thinking, and that is something we explore in great detail during these online therapy sessions.

So, if you would like to learn more about online therapy for social phobia, please visit my website, CounselingTherapyOnline.com and email me and then we can discuss in more detail if online therapy is a good choice for you to manage your social phobia. Thank you!

To learn more about Social Phobia and Social Anxiety Disorder, visit the National Institute of Mental Health website: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/social-phobia-social-anxiety-disorder/index.shtml

ONLINE THERAPIST FOR SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

Online Therapy via Skype. Online Therapy for Social Phobia.

 

 

EMAIL ME TO ASK YOUR QUESTIONS AND SCHEDULE AN ONLINE THERAPY SESSION TODAY

PDMSRONG@MAC.COM

"Mindfulness Therapy is one of the most effective approaches currently available for successfully managing anxiety. Now Mindfulness Therapy is available online via individual Skype sessions."

I provide online therapy for social anxiety disorder (SAD) via Skype. I specialize in Mindfulness Therapy, which is a particularly effective approach for changing the underlying process that creates anxiety. Talk therapy may be useful but it is limited because it does not change the underlying anxiety itself. CBT is more effective than the usual counseling approach because it focuses on helping you change the habitual patterns of thinking that feed the anxiety and amplify anxiety, but even this approach is limited because it does not change the emotion itself. During Mindfulness Therapy sessions we focus on changing the anxiety emotion directly by changing the emotional imagery associated with the anxiety - literally how you see the emotion in the mind. When you transform this emotional imagery, the emotion diminishes and begins to resolve itself. When the emotion resolves the reactive thinking also changes and resolves by itself and new beliefs, thoughts and perceptions arise that are more positive and lead to greater well-being. This approach works extremely well and most people see significant improvement after 3-6 online therapy sessions.

CONTACT ME if you would like to learn more about online therapy for social anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and other anxiety disorders.

Here is some useful background information on social anxiety disorder, also known as Social Phobia.

Social Phobia (Social Anxiety Disorder): Always Embarrassed

Introduction

Are you afraid of being judged by others or of being embarrassed all the time? Do you feel extremely fearful and unsure around other people most of the time? Do these worries make it hard for you to do everyday tasks like run errands, or talk to people at work or school?

If so, you may have a type of anxiety disorder called social phobia, also called social anxiety disorder.

What is social phobia?

Social phobia is a strong fear of being judged by others and of being embarrassed. This fear can be so strong that it gets in the way of going to work or school or doing other everyday things.

Everyone has felt anxious or embarrassed at one time or another. For example, meeting new people or giving a public speech can make anyone nervous. But people with social phobia worry about these and other things for weeks before they happen.

People with social phobia are afraid of doing common things in front of other people. For example, they might be afraid to sign a check in front of a cashier at the grocery store, or they might be afraid to eat or drink in front of other people, or use a public restroom. Most people who have social phobia know that they shouldn't be as afraid as they are, but they can't control their fear. Sometimes, they end up staying away from places or events where they think they might have to do something that will embarrass them. For some people, social phobia is a problem only in certain situations, while others have symptoms in almost any social situation.

Social phobia usually starts during youth. A doctor can tell that a person has social phobia if the person has had symptoms for at least 6 months. Without treatment, social phobia can last for many years or a lifetime.

What are the signs and symptoms of social phobia?

People with social phobia tend to:

  • Be very anxious about being with other people and have a hard time talking to them, even though they wish they could
  • Be very self-conscious in front of other people and feel embarrassed
  • Be very afraid that other people will judge them
  • Worry for days or weeks before an event where other people will be
  • Stay away from places where there are other people
  • Have a hard time making friends and keeping friends
  • Blush, sweat, or tremble around other people
  • Feel nauseous or sick to their stomach when with other people.

What causes social phobia?

Social phobia sometimes runs in families, but no one knows for sure why some people have it, while others don't. Researchers have found that several parts of the brain are involved in fear and anxiety. Some researchers think that misreading of others’ behavior may play a role in causing social phobia. For example, you may think that people are staring or frowning at you when they truly are not. Weak social skills are another possible cause of social phobia. For example, if you have weak social skills, you may feel discouraged after talking with people and may worry about doing it in the future. By learning more about fear and anxiety in the brain, scientists may be able to create better treatments. Researchers are also looking for ways in which stress and environmental factors may play a role.

How is social phobia treated?

First, talk to your doctor about your symptoms. Your doctor should do an exam to make sure that an unrelated physical problem isn’t causing the symptoms. The doctor may refer you to a mental health specialist.

Social phobia is generally treated with psychotherapy, medication, or both.

Psychotherapy. A type of psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is especially useful for treating social phobia. It teaches a person different ways of thinking, behaving, and reacting to situations that help him or her feel less anxious and fearful. It can also help people learn and practice social skills.

Medication. Doctors also may prescribe medication to help treat social phobia. The most commonly prescribed medications for social phobia are anti- anxiety medications and antidepressants. Anti-anxiety medications are powerful and there are different types. Many types begin working right away, but they generally should not be taken for long periods.

Antidepressants are used to treat depression, but they are also helpful for social phobia. They are probably more commonly prescribed for social phobia than anti-anxiety medications. Antidepressants may take several weeks to start working. Some may cause side effects such as headache, nausea, or difficulty sleeping. These side effects are usually not a problem for most people, especially if the dose starts off low and is increased slowly over time. Talk to your doctor about any side effects you may have.

A type of antidepressant called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are especially effective in treating social phobia. However, they are rarely used as a first line of treatment because when MAOIs are combined with certain foods or other medicines, dangerous side effects can occur.

It’s important to know that although antidepressants can be safe and effective for many people, they may be risky for some, especially children, teens, and young adults. A “black box”—the most serious type of warning that a prescription drug can have—has been added to the labels of antidepressant medications. These labels warn people that antidepressants may cause some people to have suicidal thoughts or make suicide attempts.

Anyone taking antidepressants should be monitored closely, especially when they first start treatment.

Another type of medication called beta-blockers can help control some of the physical symptoms of social phobia such as excessive sweating, shaking, or a racing heart. They are most commonly prescribed when the symptoms of social phobia occur in specific situations, such as “stage fright.”

Some people do better with CBT, while others do better with medication. Still others do best with a combination of the two. Talk with your doctor about the best treatment for you.

What is it like having social phobia?

"In school I was always afraid of being called on, even when I knew the answers. When I got a job, I hated to meet with my boss. I couldn't eat lunch with my co-workers. I worried about being stared at or judged, and worried that I would make a fool of myself. My heart would pound and I would start to sweat when I thought about meetings. The feelings got worse as the time of the event got closer. Sometimes I couldn't sleep or eat for days before a staff meeting."

"I'm taking medicine and working with a counselor to cope better with my fears. I had to work hard, but I feel better. I'm glad I made that first call to my doctor."

For More Information

Contact us to find out more about Social Phobia (Social Anxiety Disorder).

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Mindfulness Therapy is an Effective Method for Overcoming Panic Anxiety and Excessive Shyness

There are a number of new treatments available that are proving to be very effective for social anxiety or social phobia - that intense self-consciousness or shyness that many people experience in public situations. Generally, the process-oriented therapies such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and the Mindfulness-based Therapies are most effective.

The focus of these therapeutic approaches is to help you break free from the habitual patterns of negative and self-limiting beliefs and thoughts that provide the inner structure that creates anxiety and panic attacks.

You start by learning to recognize these reactive thoughts as soon as they arise and before they take hold. This is critical. As the saying goes, "it is what you don't see that controls you" and if you don't see those habitual thoughts then you will remain under their control. However, as soon as you begin to see them, then you can restore control and stop them in their tracks.

However, recognizing your thoughts is just the first step of change. Those thoughts also have a great deal of emotional energy associated with them and this is what we need to neutralize if we are to break free from their control.

CBT is excellent for helping you recognize your thought habits, and Mindfulness Therapy, which is what I teach online, combines CBT with a very powerful method to neutralize and resolve the underlying anxiety that sustains the whole process of reactive thinking.

I am always excited to see how quickly people can change when we take this double-edged approach of changing both the cognitive reactions and emotional reactions. Generally, people can expect to see big improvements after 4-6 sessions of Mindfulness Therapy. Even the first session can really turn things around.

"I used to be so afraid of embarrassing myself, of having a panic attack in front of people. I would lay awake at night worrying what people thought about me. This had been going on for years. Then I took a few sessions with Dr. Strong. Now my anxiety no longer controls me and I can control my thoughts. Definitely worth trying."

"I want to feel at ease around people instead of worrying what they might be thinking about me. Peter taught me how to make friends with my thoughts, which was strange at first because I hated being this way so much. But, mindfulness really worked for me."

Social Phobia Therapy Online

How Do I Start Online Therapy for My Social Phobia?

If you are really interested in changing and breaking free from the grip of anxiety around people, then simply email me and email me. Ask your questions and schedule your first Skype session. There are no upfront payments and satisfaction is guaranteed.

START TODAY WITH A FREE EMAIL CONSULTATION

PDMSRONG@MAC.COM

Peter Strong, PhD is a Professional Psychotherapist, Online Therapist, Spiritual Teacher and Author, based in Boulder, Colorado. Peter developed a system of psychotherapy called Mindfulness Therapy for healing the root cause of Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Depression, Traumatic Stress and Emotional Suffering.

Get the help you need to overcome your social phobia or excessive shyness around people using the well-tested methods of Mindfulness Therapy

ONLINE THERAPIST FOR SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

Here is the article for more background information on SAD and CBT

Link: http://socialphobia.org/social-anxiety-disorder-definition-symptoms-treatment-therapy-medications-insight-prognosis

Social Anxiety Fact Sheet: What is Social Anxiety Disorder? Symptoms, Treatment, Prevalence, Medications, Insight, Prognosis

Social Anxiety Disorder (social phobia) is the third largest mental health care problem in the world today.

The latest government epidemiological data show social anxiety affects about 7% of the population at any given time.  The lifetime prevalence rate (i.e., the chances of developing social anxiety disorder at any time during the lifespan) stands slightly above 13%.  (See journal citation on the Social Anxiety Association home page.)

Definition

Social anxiety is the fear of social situations that involve interaction with other people. You could say social anxiety is the fear and anxiety of being negatively judged and evaluated by other people.  It is a pervasive disorder and causes anxiety and fear in most all areas of a person's life.  It is chronic because it does not go away on its own.  Only direct cognitive-behavioral therapy can change the brain, and help people overcome social anxiety.

Perceptions

People with social anxiety are many times seen by others as being shy, quiet, backward, withdrawn, inhibited, unfriendly, nervous, aloof, and disinterested.

Paradoxically, people with social anxiety want to make friends, be included in groups, and be involved and engaged in social interactions.  But having social anxiety prevents people from being able to do the things they want to do.  Although people with social anxiety want to be friendly, open, and sociable, it is fear (anxiety) that holds them back.

Triggering Symptoms

People with social anxiety usually experience significant distress in the following situations:

  • Being introduced to other people
  • Being teased or criticized
  • Being the center of attention
  • Being watched or observed while doing something
  • Having to say something in a formal, public situation
  • Meeting people in authority ("important people/authority figures")
  • Feeling insecure and out of place in social situations ("I don’t know what to say.")
  • Embarrassing easily (e.g., blushing, shaking)
  • Meeting other peoples’ eyes
  • Swallowing, writing, talking, making phone calls if in public
 
This list is not a complete list of symptoms -- other symptoms may be associated with social anxiety as well.
 

Emotional Symptoms

The feelings that accompany social anxiety include anxiety, high levels of fear, nervousness, automatic negative emotional cycles, racing heart, blushing, excessive sweating, dry throat and mouth, trembling, and muscle twitches. In severe situations, people can develop a dysmorphia concerning part of their body (usually the face) in which they perceive themselves irrationally and negatively.
Constant, intense anxiety (fear) is the most common symptom.
 

Insight

People with social anxiety typically know that their anxiety is irrational, is not based on fact, and does not make rational sense.  Nevertheless, thoughts and feelings of anxiety persist and are chronic (i.e., show no signs of going away).  Appropriate active, structured, cognitive-behavioral therapy is the only solution to this problem. Decades of research have concluded that this type of therapy is the only way to change the neural pathways in the brain permanently.  This means that a permanent change is possible for everyone.
 

Seeking Help

Social anxiety, as well as the other anxiety disorders, can be successfully treated today.  In seeking help for this problem, we recommend searching for a specialist -- someone who understands this problem well and knows how to treat it.
Social anxiety treatment must include an active behavioral therapy group, where members can work on their "anxiety" hierarchies in the group, and later, in real-life situations with other group members.
Social anxiety is a fully treatable condition (link is external) and can be overcome with effective therapy, work, and patience.
 

Therapy (Treatment)

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety has been markedly successful. Thousands of research studies now indicate that, after the completion of social anxiety-specific CBT, people with social anxiety disorder are changed.  They now live a life that is no longer controlled by fear and anxiety.  Appropriate therapy is markedly successful in changing people's thoughts, beliefs, feelings, and behavior.  The person with social anxiety disorder must be compliant and do what is necessary to overcome this disorder.
National Institutes of Mental Health-funded studies report a very high success rate using cognitive therapy with a behavioral therapy group.  Both are essential to alleviating anxiety symptoms associated with social anxiety disorder.
 

Medication

Social anxiety medication is useful for many, but not all, people with social anxiety disorder.  For social anxiety, research indicates use of the anti-anxiety agents, and (perhaps) certain antidepressants in conjunction with CBT have proven most beneficial.  Medication without the use of active, structured cognitive-behavioral therapy has no long-term benefits.  Only CBT can change the neural pathway associations in the brain permanently.  The therapy used must "fit" the way the human brain is structured.
Current research indicates many antidepressant medications for social anxiety disorder to be useless, even in the short-term.   About 15% of our in-person socially-anxious people are helped by antidepressants.  Some of the large-scale medication studies for social anxiety have been questioned and found to be skewed in favor of the drugs marketed by the same pharmaceutical companies who paid for these studies to be done in the first place.  These kind of studies are conflicts-of-interest, and their conclusions should be thoroughly questioned.
 
In addition, each person is different, and there is no general rule that works concerning social anxiety and medications.  For a typical person with social anxiety, who has an "average" amount of anxiety, along the quantifiable continuum, we have found an anti-anxiety agent to be most effective, if the person has no history of substance abuse.  Antidepressants do not work anywhere near as well, in general.   A typical superstititon, promoted by the drug companies, is that antidepressants have anti-anxiety properties.  This is not true.  If anything, many of the antidepressants make a person MORE anxious.   However, not all people want or need medication.  One of the big changes in the last decade is the gradual non-use of medications by people coming into active therapy for social anxiety.  The majority of people in our groups now choose not to use medications and to concentrate solely on CBT.
 
Nevertheless, it is the combination of cognitive and behavioral therapy that changes the brain and allows you to overcome social anxiety.  Medications can only temporarily change brain chemistry and can be useful in some cases.    This is very general advice, and you must consult with your psychiatrist when it comes to medications.  Try to find someone who understands that anti-anxiety agents are not addictive to people with diagnosable anxiety disorders.  In twenty years, we have never had even one patient who has moved up their dosage of an anti-anxiety agent once an adequate baseline is established as being effective.  Social anxiety people can be helped by a low dose of an anti-anxiety agents (there is a reason why we prefer a low dose of either lorazepam or clonazepam for this purpose).THIS ADVICE (above) only applies to people who have a diagnosable (DSM-5: 300.23) case of social anxiety disorder.  You cannot  generalize this out to other mental health care conditions.

Compliance with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive-behavioral (rational) therapy is not difficult to do, and has not been seen this way by participants.  The first factor in not complying with the therapy is that "I can't remember to do it every day" and "I have a hard time committing to something in which I don't see immediate results".  The psychologist or group leader should have time-tested solutions to these irrational arguments.
 

Prognosis

Prognosis is markedly good. People completing CBT training report a high success rate, compared to control groups. In the National Institute of Mental Health longitudinal studies, people continued to report progress after CBT behavioral group therapy was over.  Studies repeatedly indicate that treatment compatibility (i.e., did the person carry out the prescribed therapy?) is the key element in success.  Using different terminology, the social anxiety people who understand and follow the directions to be repetitive with the therapy report the most positive changes in lessening anxious feelings and thoughts.  Repetition and reinforcement of rational concepts, strategies, and methods (and their implementation) is the key to alleviating social anxiety disorder on a long-term basis.
People can and do overcome social anxiety if they stick with the cognitive strategies and pratically apply them to their lives.
 

Differential Diagnosis and Comorbidity

Social anxiety disorder is one of the five major anxiety disorders as listed in the DSM-5.
Social anxiety is many times confused with panic disorder (link is external).  People with social anxiety do not experience panic attacks (they may experience "anxiety attacks"), in which the principal fear is of having a medical problem (e.g., heart attack).  People with social anxiety realize that it is anxiety and fear that they are experiencing.  They may say things like "It was awful and I panicked!", but, when questioned, they are talking about feeling highly anxious.  They are not talking about the fear of having a medical problem.  People with social anxiety do not go to hospital emergency rooms after an anxiety situation.  People with panic disorder many times go to hospital emergency rooms, or doctor's offices, at first because they feel there is something physically wrong with them.
High rates of alcoholism and other substance abuse, family difficulties and problems, lack of personal relationships, and difficulty in obtaining and continuing with employment are among the everyday problems experienced by many people with social anxiety disorder.
 

A Big Problem

Lack of professional and knowledgeable therapists is the biggest and most relevant problem to overcoming social anxiety.  While it can be done, and a vast amount of clinical and research evidence supports this, overcoming social anxiety is difficult because of the scarcity of treatment facilities for people with this persistent anxiety disorder.
Often, we are led to the conclusion that effective therapy -- whether from a psychologist or from a non-licensed person -- comes only from people who have experienced this disorder themselves.  Twenty years of experience points to the fact that people who have lived with this disorder and overcome it, make the best group leaders.
 
--Thomas A. Richards, Ph.D., Psychologist
President, Social Anxiety Association

How to Overcome Stage Fright with Mindfulness Therapy Online

Online Therapy to Overcome Stage Fright

Get Help to Stop Presentation Anxiety and Stage Fright through Online Therapy

EMAIL ME TO ASK YOUR QUESTIONS AND SCHEDULE AN ONLINE THERAPY SESSION TODAY

PDMSRONG@MAC.COM

"Mindfulness Therapy is one of the most effective approaches currently available for successfully managing anxiety. Now Mindfulness Therapy is available online via individual Skype sessions."

Fear of Public Speaking

Having to speak in public or present in front of a group at work can be a terrifying experience for many people. This anxiety reaction typically revolves around two themes: The fear of not living up to expectation, and the fear of embarrassment, where we are afraid that we will make such a mess of things that we will never be able to regain the respect of others. Not living up to expectation is closely related to a primal need we all have for approval, and to feel that we are accepted as part of the group. This need goes back to our earliest history as social animals, as part of the pack or tribe.

The Psychology of Fear

These performance anxiety reactions all feed on habitual reactive thinking, or rumination, in which our mind becomes overrun by catastrophic negative thinking. It's as if our thinking goes into overdrive. We become hypersensitive, where the slightest change in expression in the audience, a cough or noise, are taken as bad signs that stimulate catastrophic thinking. Hyper-reactive thinking not only creates considerable emotional stress and anxiety but it  also clouds the mind making us less able to respond intelligently and skillfully to situations. We become paralyzed by the fear and often completely lose our train of thought.

Besides hyper-reactive thinking we also have to contend with core beliefs about our self and our abilities. Negative self-beliefs have a similar effect in reducing our ability to respond in an intelligent and fluid way to situations as they present themselves. Negative self-beliefs adversely affect our confidence and self-esteem.

The combined effect of reactive thinking and limiting self-beliefs is that we experience what I call a "Psychological Contraction" where we feel very, very small and extremely vulnerable. It feels as if the walls are closing in and we are at the center of everyone's attention. This contraction is experienced as quite a claustrophobic feeling, and physically we might feel a strong tightness in the chest and constriction of the throat.

Online Therapy to Overcome Stage Fright - Overcoming Reactive Thinking through Mindfulness Therapy

Clearly, if we want to stop the psychological contraction of an anxiety attack we need to modulate our reactive thinking. Now this has to be done skillfully, because simply telling yourself to stop worrying is not likely to work and may even make things worse as we add yet another layer of reactive thinking to our reactivity.

In Mindfulness-based Online Therapy we understand that the most crucial way to stop reactive thinking is to change the way we relate to the reactivity itself. Instead of fighting it or trying to avoid reactions, which simply makes things worse, we actually learn how to become non-reactive toward our reactions. This mindfulness response has the effect of creating a space around the reaction and prevents it from igniting further reactions. It is like controlling a wild fire, where the best approach is usually to apply your efforts in containing the fire by creating a clear space around it so that the fire cannot find fuel to spread itself.

If a thought arises such as "They don't like what I am saying," we don't fight the thought, but rather we acknowledge the thought and learn to hold the thought without becoming reactive toward it. If you hold a thought, any thought, in this way then the thought reaction cannot feed and create more reactivity. Instead, the thought begins to lose its energy and simply withers away.

With mindfulness practice we learn to acknowledge and hold each thought in this way as they arise. We create a space around each one in turn and allow each thought to burn itself out.

Now, in this process of creating more space around reactive thoughts, we are also counteracting the psychological contraction that leads to paralysis and loss of malleability in our ability to respond. Mindfulness is expansive by its very nature and keeping  a spacious sense internally is essential for successful public speaking and performance.

 

Would You like to Learn more about Mindfulness Therapy for Overcoming Fear of Public Speaking?

Online Therapy to Overcome Stage Fright

Contact me today and we can discuss how Online Mindfulness Therapy can help you overcome stage fright and other anxiety issues through this Online Counseling Service.

PDMSRONG@MAC.COM

TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF
ASK YOUR QUESTIONS
SCHEDULE A SKYPE THERAPY SESSION
>>There is no charge unless you are completely satisfied with each session. This is my satisfaction guarantee to you<<

Talk to an online therapist for help with overcoming anxiety, panic attacks and stage fright using the well-tested principles of Mindfulness Therapy

See: Social Phobia Therapy Online

ONLINE THERAPIST FOR SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

Online Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

 

START TODAY WITH A FREE EMAIL CONSULTATION

PDMSTRONG@MAC.COM

Peter Strong, PhD is a Professional Psychotherapist, Online Therapist, Spiritual Teacher and Author, based in Boulder, Colorado. Peter developed a system of psychotherapy called Mindfulness Therapy for healing the root cause of Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Depression, Traumatic Stress and Emotional Suffering.

Get Help from a Professional Online Therapist via Skype for Effective Online Counseling and Online Therapy - Social Anxiety Therapy Online


2 Responses to SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER THERAPY ONLINE

    • Good question! There is lots involved in transforming agoraphobia and panic disorder, but it all begins when you train yourself to develop a conscious and compassionate relationship with the anxiety emotions themselves. The biggest problem is in the habitual reactions of avoidance and aversion toward these emotions. This only feeds the anxiety. When we develop a mindfulness-based relationship (MBR) with our emotions, then and only then does change become possible.

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